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Changing your perspective about chocolate consumption

Updated: Nov 6, 2020

Chocolate receives a lot of bad press because of its high fat and sugar content. Its consumption has been associated with acne, obesity, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, and diabetes.


However, according to a review of chocolate’s health effects published in the Netherlands Journal of Medicine, it’s not all bad news.


The authors point to the discovery that cocoa, the key ingredient in chocolate, contains biologically active phenolic compounds.


This has changed people’s views on chocolate, and it has stimulated research into how it might impact ageing, and conditions such as oxidative stress, blood pressure regulation, and atherosclerosis.


Chocolate’s antioxidant potential may have a range of health benefits. The higher the cocoa content, as in dark chocolate, the more benefits there are. Dark chocolate may also contain less fat and sugar, but it is important to check the label.

Eating chocolate may have the following benefits:

  • lowering cholesterol levels

  • preventing cognitive decline

  • reducing the risk of cardiovascular problems

In addition, chocolate bars do not contain only cocoa. The benefits and risks of any other ingredients, such as sugar and fat, need to be considered.


1) Cholesterol

One study, published in The Journal of Nutrition, suggests that chocolate consumption might help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, also known as “bad cholesterol.”

The researchers set out to investigate whether chocolate bars containing plant sterols (PS) and cocoa flavanols (CF) have any effect on cholesterol levels.

The authors concluded: “Regular consumption of chocolate bars containing PS and CF, as part of a low-fat diet, may support cardiovascular health by lowering cholesterol and improving blood pressure.”


2) Cognitive function

Scientists at Harvard Medical School have suggested that drinking two cups of hot chocolate a day could help keep the brain healthy and reduce memory decline in older people.

The researchers found that hot chocolate helped improve blood flow to parts of the brain where it was needed.


Results of a lab experiment, published in 2014, indicated that a cocoa extract, called lavado, might reduce or prevent damage to nerve pathways found in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. This extract could help slow symptoms such as cognitive decline.

Another study, published in 2016 in the journal Appetite, suggests eating chocolate at least once weekly could improve cognitive function.


3) Heart disease

Research published in The BMJ, suggests that consuming chocolate could help lower the risk of developing heart disease by one-third. Based on their observations, the authors concluded that higher levels of cho